Seminar Details

Seminar Title
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Simulation and some experimental studies of post-combustion treatment on CI engine exhaust for mitigating CO2
Seminar Type
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Registration Seminar
Department
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Mechanical Engineering
Speaker Type
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Student
Speaker Name
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R. Maniarasu (518ME1027)
Date  &  Time
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05 Aug 2020  10:30 AM
Venue
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Mechanical Engineering Department
Contact
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Dr R K Behera, ME, 06612462504
Abstract
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Carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted from internal combustion (IC) engines is significant and contribute to global warming. IC engines are used in automotive vehicles, locomotives, construction equipment, power generation, agricultural and industrial applications. Compression ignition (CI) engines are available for power generation range from 200 kW to 2000 kW as well as automotive vehicles in large number. Although, many researchers have focused onto the power plant, cement industry to control CO2 and negligible work to be carried out in CI engine. The CI engine generally emits higher NOx, particulate matter and particularly high CO2 when compared to spark ignition engine (SI engine). In this aspect, control of CO2 is of more interest to do research in this area. There are possible ways to capture CO2 such as post-combustion, pre-combustion and oxy-fuel combustion. Post-combustion capture method is one of the most potential methods to capture CO2 from combustion products, because pre-combustion and oxy-fuel combustion methods require multiple conversion processes, huge investment, high energy for air separation unit, gas purification and compression units. Different techniques such as absorption, adsorption, membrane and cryogenic distillation have adapted for capturing CO2. The main objective of this research is to mitigate CO2 in a CI engine. The research work will be carried out on a single cylinder, 4-stroke, naturally aspirated, DI diesel engine running rated 4.4 kw power at a constant speed of 1500 rpm to operate on diesel . As the first step of the investigation, activated carbon obtained from bio-char will be used as adsorbents for carbon capture. Two different categories of biomass materials will be used to produce bio-char. In the second step, the activated carbon will be characterized using FTIR and SEM for different samples. As the third step of the investigations, the activated carbon will be tested in the test engine. The results obtained will be used to predict for a large gen-set by using aspen plus software.