Seminar Details

Seminar Title
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Study of metabolome during nonhost resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana against Magnaporthe oryzae
Seminar Type
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Progress Seminar
Department
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Life Science
Speaker Type
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Student
Speaker Name
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DEBASISH PATI ( RollNo : 518LS1005)
Date  &  Time
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12 Apr 2021  05:00 PM
Venue
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Online in MS team (Code: 1vkbpeg)
Contact
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Prof. Binod Bihari Sahu
Abstract
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Rice is the most staple food crop produce world-wide India holds 2nd position globally for rice cultivar. Population explosion, lack of crop land and recurrent natural calamities including biotic stress affect food crop yield, which in turn affect human. Due to the biotic factors, there is great load on crops and can be treated as an extra burden on their productivity. Among the biotic factors, fungal diseases count 2/3rd of the total loss, in which Magnaporthe oryzae is the 3rd most devastating pathogen that cause rice blast disease, leads to 30% crop loss annually. To prevent the pathogen ingress and further infestation on crops, farmers apply chemical pesticides that lead to adverse consequences on environment as well as on food chain. As an alternative, nonhost mediated resistance development can pave wider and better opportunity toward resistant variety crop development. Nonhost resistance (NHR) is the inherent ability of a plant to resist all genetic variants of a particular pathogen species. Such plants are called nonhosts against that particular pathogen and in the current study, we will be taking Arabidopsis thaliana as a nonhost against rice blast. In the basal level, both host and pathogen modulate and alter their metabolites to interact with each other to create a surviving environment. Secondary metabolites are mainly responsible for resistance against any pathogen the group of metabolites can also act as a fingerprint for any particular organism. Metabolomic study bridge between the transcriptomic and phenotypic character under an investigation. That’s why, we are focusing on the active metabolites responsible for the nonhost resistance in our study. To identify and characterise active metabolites, we will use LC-MS mediated spectroscopic approach, as it has broader capability to identify non-targeted metabolites in organisms. For the purpose, we considered three ecotype of A. thaliana viz. Col-0, pen2-3 and mosA. Col-0 is the wild type variety and completely resistant to the respective pathogen pen2-3 is a mutant where the gene is responsible for beta glycosidase production pathway, and susceptible to M. oryzae. mosA is the lab generated EMS mutant (MTHFR gene) that plausibly mediate the major 1-carbon metabolic pathway which is highly susceptible to infection by rice blast pathogen as compared to pen2-3. In our study, we plan to characterise active constituents in mosA mutant keeping pen2-3 as standard, in comparison to metabolomic data of Col-0. The comparative metabolomic study can lead to identification of the active metabolites from the nonhost which in turn would help in accessing the application potential of the same against rice blast. Further, the metabolomics pathway will be studied to delineate its relevance if any, in the host.